Uses of Custard Apple Leaves – What They Are, How to Use Them?

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The leaves of the custard apple are used for their high concentration of dietary pectin, a general term for the soluble fiber found in plants. The more pectin a piece of food has, the more easily it will “set” or “ligature” (waterproof) and the less likely it will congeal in liquid. The varying concentrations of pectin found in different parts of the apple tree — the seeds, the innermost leaves, and the outer, fibrous skin — all work together to make the leaves a powerful source of pectin. Pectin is found in several forms in the custard apple, and the concentration in each part of the apple tree determines how useful it is as a dietary source of pectin.

What Are Custard Apple Leaves?

Custard apple leaves come in three types: the outer, fibrous skin, the innermost leaves, and the seeds. The fibrous skin of the leaves is made up mainly of water and H2O2, while the leaves on the inside have a higher concentration of pectin. The concentration of pectin in the leaves is higher in the outer leaves than in the other two types, and it’s this concentration that makes the leaves of the custard apple such a potent source of pectin. Leaf Curls – Leaf curls are vertical folds that develop on the upper surface of the leaves when a part of the leaf is exposed to cold air.

They indicate that the cell wall of that part of the leaf has been damaged, and the pectin in that part of the leaf is, therefore, more accessible to the air. Leaf Resemblances – Leaf similarities are vertical and folding patterns that develop on the lower surface of the leaves when a part of the leaf is exposed to cold air. The cell walls of both the upper and lower surfaces of the leaf are likely to be intact, thereby allowing H2O2 to enter the leaf and regulating the level of water in the leaf.

How to Use Custard Apple Leaves

The leaves of the custard apple are best used in soups, casseroles, and stews. They can also be used in oatmeal and in recipes calling for cream of mushroom or cream of potato. They can also be used in a cobbler or crème brûlée as a sweetener. For soups, casseroles, and stews, 1/4 to 1/2 cup of leaves per 1/2 to 3/4 cup of soup or casserole works best. For oatmeal and crème brûlée, 1/4 to 1/2 cup of leaves per 1/2 to 3/4 cup of milk or water works best.

Why You Should Spread the Word About Custard Apple Leaves

Custard apple leaves are a unique addition to the diet and can provide a large boost of fiber. Fiber is known to help with digestive issues such as constipation and diverticulitis. A study in Poland found that people who ate the most fiber also tended to have the highest rates of colon cancer. Fiber also helps with weight loss and with relieving acidity in the stomach. Studies have also found that consuming 5 or 6 leaves of the custard apple daily is able to significantly improve cholesterol, blood pressure, and metabolic syndrome risk factors. You can also try adding them to your smoothie or juices for a more healthy option.

Conclusion

The leaves of the custard apple are a good source of dietary fiber and can also be used as a natural sweetener, a source of vitamin C, and as protection against heart disease. They can even be used as a tonic to help with stress and anxiety. The various parts of the custard apple have different amounts of pectin, which determines how useful it is as a dietary source of pectin. The leaves are the most pectineus part of the apple and can be used in soups, casseroles, and stews. The seeds are the next most pectineus part of the apple and can be used in soups and casseroles as well. The middle, fibrous skin is a poor source of pectin but can be used in baking. The only problem with spreading the word about custard apple leaves is that people might think that they can replace a certain type of carbohydrate in their diet.

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